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inspirations from warren buffett, skylar fang, john trump, jema arizona, chris robin, emily flecher, judy gust, frank murphy, lilyn cheekawood, megan barry, and abbey wood

Month

July 2016

some close friends and relatives of Amy Weng who happens to reside Anthen, Greece

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Tu Jun

Meng Ying

Lu Xiaohua

Li Donghua

Zhou Huiju

Yan Ji

Yan Qun

Zen Shijie

Suo Feng

He Mingying

Zhou Feng

Zhao Xin

Yao Ming

Ye Li

Yao Xinlei

Zhao Wei

Huang Feng

Huang Siyue

Wang Ming

Peng Yuewan

Zhao Chunfeng

Tan Xiaoyan

Guan Moye

Zhang Yongming

Fan Senlin

Wu Lifu

Jiu Quansen

Jiu Xinyi (Sherlyn)

Xu Xiaojing

He Yan

You Jiangsheng

Zhu Xiaofeng

Han Bing

Zhao Yuhan

Peng Yuhe

Peng Danping

Zhou Ningning

Sun Jianfei

Yang Fei

Wang Fei

Li Yapeng

Li Yan

Yu Lanfeng

Yang Guoping

Hu Qiaoqiao

Hu Xuefeng

Wu Jinlong

He Jinyuan

Wang Mingfa

Liu Xianjing

Peng Yunlan

Peng Jiaochun

Peng Mei E

Bie Mama

Bie Yuejing

Shuai Jiajing

Shuai Ying E

Shuai Jialiang

Shuai Dasi

Shuai Xi Er

Shuai Yue E

Wang Xinzhou

Wang Qingzhi

Yan Silin

He jiaying

Peng Hounian

Yan Simei

Peng Chuanxian

Peng Shuhua

Chen Jiaqing

Huang Wenfan

Xu Taiping

Chen Guiqiang

Cheng Yong

Cheng Li

Rao Mingrong

Yao Shinlei (Amylin)

Gong Xiao

Gong Li

Zhou Xin E

Cheng Youzhi

Zhu Daifang

Zhu Daihong

Zhu Qun E

Zhu Ai E

Tang Gangqing

Tang Gangbo

Tang Gangbiao

Qian Yu

Qian Jie

Yang Zhiyuan

Yang Fei

Yan Yongcui

Peng Xiagui

Peng Dongfang

Peng Shuicai

Peng Houyuan

Wang Zhuanying

Zhang Wangying

Peng You Er

Bie Chang E

Bie Xin Zhi

Wu Wenhui

Dai Ai E

Zhu Taozhi

Li Aiqun

Rao shaohua

Peng Zuo

Zhou Kaiming

Wu Jiahong

Wang Daxue

Shuai Jin E

Wu Hongwen

Peng Huo Jun

Peng Rong Er

Peng Houde

Peng Hanting

Peng Fusheng

Peng Xiansheng

Peng Yingzhi

Peng Yingping

Yang Cai Hong

Yang Ai Hong

Wu Ai Hong

Wu Jialiang

Peng Younian

Peng Huangnian

Peng Chuanwa

Peng Chuanbing

He Da Jie

Hu Jintao

Hu Haiqing

Hu Haifeng

Xin Jinping

Peng Liyuan

Xi Mingze

Zhang Lei

Zhang hong

Wang Xudong

Liu Shihe

Guo Jingjing

Fu Mingxia

Wu Mingxia

Yan Liu

Chun Ni

Ni Ping

zhao Zhongqiang

Peng Zhongqiang

Yan Ju Er

Wu Sheng

Wu Mengya

Wu Tangmu

Cheng Changsheng

Liu Xifan

Li Ruibo

Dong Fang

Hu Guoliang

Yan Rong

Zhang Jinzhi

Zhang Xuezhi

Yang Meiling

Liu Ai E

Ma Bing

Li Bing

Li Qiming

Wang Nianyu

Xu Jianying

Zhen Baoxia

Yu He

Song Xiao

He Chen

Tian Junxian

Meng Jianguo

Zhang Guizhi

Zhang Dongkui

Wang Mingzhou

Wang Qi

Wang Zhiwen

Cai Guoqing

Feng Huang Chuan qi

Wu Fenghua

Wu Qiong

Chiong Yao

 

 

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tulane university hall of fame

 

Tulane University
Private university in New Orleans, Louisiana
Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. Originally founded as a public medical college in 1834, the school grew into a comprehensive university in 1847. Wikipedia
Address: 6823 St Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70118
Acceptance rate: 30% (2015)
Total enrollment: 13,449 (2015)
Mascot: Riptide the Pelican
Colors: Sky Blue, Olive
Newt Gingrich
Newt Gingrich
John Kennedy Toole
John Kennedy Toole
Huey Long
Huey Long
Michael E. DeBakey
Michael E. DeBakey
Lisa P. Jackson
Lisa P. Jackson

Founding and early history – 19th century

Paul Tulane, eponymous philanthropist of the school

The university was founded as the Medical College of Louisiana[1] in 1834 partly as a response to the fears of smallpox, yellow fever and cholera in the United States.[5] The university became only the second medical school in the South, and the 15th in the United States at the time. In 1847, the state legislature established the school as the University of Louisiana,[1] a public university, and the law department was added to the university. Subsequently, in 1851, the university established its first academic department. The first president chosen for the new university was Francis Lister Hawks, an Episcopalian priest and prominent citizen of New Orleans at the time.

The university was closed from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. After reopening, it went through a period of financial challenges because of an extended agricultural depression in the South which affected the nation’s economy. Paul Tulane, owner of a prospering dry goods and clothing business, donated extensive real estate within New Orleans for the support of education. This donation led to the establishment of a Tulane Educational Fund (TEF), whose board of administrators sought to support the University of Louisiana instead of establishing a new university. In response, through the influence of former confederate general Randall Lee Gibson, the Louisiana state legislature transferred control of the University of Louisiana to the administrators of the TEF in 1884.[1] This act created the Tulane University of Louisiana.[6] The university became privatized, and is one of only a few American universities to be converted from a state public institution to a private one.[7]

In 1884, William Preston Johnston became the first president of Tulane. He had formerly succeeded Robert E. Lee as president of Washington and Lee University after Lee’s death. He had moved to Louisiana and become president of Louisiana State University.

In 1885, the university established its graduate division, later becoming the Graduate School. One year later, gifts from Josephine Louise Newcomb totaling over $3.6 million, led to the establishment of the H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College within Tulane University. Newcomb was the first coordinate college for women in the United States and became a model for such institutions as Pembroke College and Barnard College.[8] In 1894 the College of Technology formed, which would later become the School of Engineering. In the same year, the university moved to its present-day uptown campus on historic St. Charles Avenue, five miles by streetcar from downtown New Orleans.[8]

20th century

A view of Gibson Hall in 1904, located on the uptown campus of Tulane University.

With the improvements to Tulane University in the late 19th century, Tulane had a firm foundation to build upon as the premier university of the Deep South and continued this legacy with growth in the 20th century. In 1901, the first cornerstone was laid for the F.W. Tilton Library, endowed by New Orleans businessman and philanthropist Frederick William Tilton (1821–1890). During 1907, the school established a four-year professional curriculum in architecture through the College of Technology, growing eventually into the Tulane School of Architecture. One year later, Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy were established, albeit temporarily. The School of Dentistry ended in 1928, and Pharmacy six years later.[8] In 1914, Tulane established a College of Commerce, the first business school in the South.[8] In 1925, Tulane established the independent Graduate School. Two years later, the university set up a School of Social Work, also the first in the southern United States.[8] Tulane was instrumental in promoting the arts in New Orleans and the South in establishing the Newcomb School of Art with William Woodward as director, thus establishing the renowned Newcomb Pottery. The Middle American Research Institute was established in 1925 at Tulane “for the purpose of advanced research into the history (both Indian and colonial), archaeology, tropical botany (both economic and medical), the natural resources and products, of the countries facing New Orleans across the waters to the south; to gather, index and disseminate data thereupon; and to aid in the upbuilding of the best commercial and friendly relations between these Trans-Caribbean peoples and the United States.”[9]

University College was established in 1942 as Tulane’s division of continuing education. By 1950, the School of Architecture had grown out of Engineering into an independent school. In 1958, the university was elected to the Association of American Universities, an organization consisting of sixty-two of the leading research universities in North America. The School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine again became independent from the School of Medicine in 1967. Originally established in 1912, it was arguably one of the first public health schools in the United States.[citation needed] Tulane’s School of Tropical Medicine also remains the only one of its kind in the country. On April 23, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford, Jr., spoke at Tulane University’s Fogelman Arena at the invitation of Congressman F. Edward Hebert, a representative of Louisiana’s 1st Congressional District. During the historic speech, Ford announced that the Vietnam War was “finished as far as America is concerned” – one week before the fall of Saigon. Ford drew parallels to the Battle of New Orleans, saying that such positive activity could do for America’s morale what the battle did in 1815.[10]

During World War II, Tulane was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.[11]

A detailed account of the history of Tulane University from its founding through 1965 was published by Dyer.[12]

21st century

Gibson Hall today. Facing historic St. Charles Avenue, it is the entry landmark on the uptown campus.

In July 2004, Tulane received two $30 million donations to its endowment, the largest individual or combined gifts in the university’s history. The donations came from Jim Clark, a member of the university’s board of trustees and founder of Netscape, and David Filo, a graduate of its School of Engineering and co-founder of Yahoo!. A fund-raising campaign called “Promise & Distinction” raised $730.6 million as of October 3, 2008, increasing the university’s total endowment to more than $1.1 billion; by March 2009, Yvette Jones, Tulane’s Chief Operating Officer, told Tulane’s Staff Advisory Council that the endowment “has lost close to 37%”, affected by the late-2000s recession.[13]

In April 2010, the Tulane admissions office reported that it had received 44,000 applications for the class of 2014, breaking the previous record set by the class of 2013. While unable to confirm it officially, the admissions office stated that “it appears that we have the most applications for the upcoming fall semester of any private university in the country.”[14]

Hurricane Katrina

As a result of Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and its damaging effects on New Orleans, most of the university was closed for the second time in its history—the first being during the Civil War. The closing affected the first semester of the school calendar year. The School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine’s distance learning programs and courses stayed active. The School of Medicine relocated to Houston, Texas for a year. Aside from student athletes attending college classes together on the same campuses, most undergraduate and graduate students dispersed to campuses throughout the U.S. The storm inflicted more than $650 million in damages to the University, with some of the greatest losses impacting the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library and its collections.[15]

Facing a budget shortfall, the Board of Administrators announced a “Renewal Plan” in December 2005 to reduce its annual operating budget and create a “student-centric” campus. Addressing the school’s commitment to New Orleans, a course credit involving “service learning” became a requirement for an undergraduate degree. In 2006 Tulane became the first Carnegie ranked “high research activity” institution to have an undergraduate public service graduation requirement.[16] In May 2006, graduation ceremonies included commencement speakers former Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton, who commended the students for their desire to return to Tulane and serve New Orleans in its renewal.

Campus

Uptown

Tulane University
Gibson Quad.jpg

Gibson Quadrangle
Location St. Charles Ave., S. Claiborne, Broadway, and Calhoun Sts., New Orleans, Louisiana
Area 45 acres (18.2 ha)
Built 1834
Architectural style Renaissance, Romanesque, Modern
NRHP Reference # 78001433[17]
Added to NRHP March 24, 1978

Tulane’s primary campus is located in Uptown New Orleans on St. Charles Avenue, directly opposite Audubon Park, and extends north to South Claiborne Avenue through Freret and Willow Street. The campus is known colloquially as the Uptown or St. Charles campus. It was established in the 1890s and occupies more than 110 acres (0.45 km2) of land. The campus is known both for its large live oak trees as well as its architecturally historic buildings. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1978. The campus architecture consists of several styles, including Richardsonian Romanesque, Elizabethan, Italian Renaissance, Mid-Century Modern, and contemporary styles. The front campus buildings use Indiana White Limestone or orange brick for exteriors, while the middle campus buildings are mostly adorned in red St. Joe brick, the staple of Newcomb College Campus buildings. Loyola University is directly adjacent to Tulane, on the downriver side. Audubon Place, where the President of Tulane resides, is on the upriver side. The President’s residence is the former home of “banana king” Sam Zemurray, who donated it in his will.

Tilton Memorial Hall, home to the Departments of Economics and Political Economy.

The centerpiece of the Gibson Quad is the first academic building built on campus, Gibson Hall, in 1894. The schools of Architecture and Social Work are also located on the oldest section of the campus. The middle of the campus, between Freret and Willow Streets and bisected by McAlister Place and Newcomb Place, serves as the center of campus activities. The Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, Fogelman Arena, McAlister Auditorium, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, and most of the student residence halls and academic buildings populate the center of campus. The Howard-Tilton Memorial Library has been under construction since Spring 2013. Two additional floors and various other cosmetic renovations are expected to be finished by Spring 2014. The facilities for the Freeman School of Business line McAlister Place and sit next to the Tulane Law School. The middle campus is also home to the historic Newcomb College Campus, which sits between Newcomb Place and Broadway. The Newcomb campus was designed by New York architect James Gamble Rogers, noted for his work with Yale University‘s campus.[18] The Newcomb campus is home to Tulane’s performing and fine arts venues.

Newcomb Quad on Tulane’s Uptown campus

The back of campus, between Willow Street and South Claiborne, is home to two residence halls, Reily Recreation Center and Turchin Stadium, the home of Green Wave baseball. In January 2013, ground was broken on Tulane’s Yulman Stadium between Reily Recreation Center and Turchin Stadium. Tulane Green Wave Football had played in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome after Tulane Stadium‘s demolition in 1980. They now play in Yulman Stadium, opened in September 2014.

After Hurricane Katrina, Tulane has continued to build new facilities and renovate old spaces on its campus. The newest dorm building, Weatherhead Hall, was completed in 2011 and houses sophomore honor students giving it the nickname “SOHO” amongst students. Construction on Zimple House, a Residential College, began in January 2013 and was completed by Summer 2014. The Lallage Feazel Wall Residential College, was completed in August 2005 and took in its first students when Tulane re-opened in January 2006. The Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life was renovated to be a green, environmentally friendly building and opened for student use in January 2007.[19] In 2009, the university altered McAlister Drive, a street that ran through the middle of the uptown campus into a pedestrian walkway renamed McAlister Place. The area was resurfaced, and the newly added green spaces were adorned with Japanese magnolias, irises and new lighting. Coincidentally, in late November 2008 the City of New Orleans announced plans to add bicycle lanes to the St. Charles Avenue corridor that runs in front of campus.[20]

Other campuses

Tulane University Hospital, located in the Medical District of downtown New Orleans and adjacent to the School of Medicine.

Environmental sustainability

Tulane hosted an Environmental Summit at its law school in April 2009, an event that all students could attend for free. Many students from Tulane’s two active environmental groups, Green Club and Environmental Law Society, attended. These student groups push for global citizenship and environmental stewardship on campus. In 2007 Tulane made a commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10%, getting students involved by providing an Energy Smart Shopping Guide and electronics “greening” services from IT. In 2010 Tulane completed its renovation of 88-year-old Dinwiddie Hall,[24] which was subsequently LEED Gold certified. A new residential college, Weatherhead Hall, opened in 2011 as housing for sophomore honors students. The residence – colloquially known as SoHo – has also applied for LEED Gold certification.[25][26] Tulane received an “A-” on the 2011 College Sustainability Report Card, garnering an award as one of the top 52 most sustainable colleges in the country.[27][28]

Organization and academics

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